It’s Linked to a Lower Risk of Heart Disease

It’s Linked to a Lower Risk of Heart Disease

Eating fresh fruits, vegetables, legumes and fiber is linked to a lower risk of heart disease (32Trusted Source, 42Trusted Source, 43Trusted Source, 44Trusted Source, 45Trusted Source).

All of these are generally eaten in large amounts in well-planned vegan diets.

Observational studies comparing vegans to vegetarians and the general population report that vegans may benefit from up to a 75% lower risk of developing high blood pressure (20Trusted Source).

Vegans may also have up to a 42% lower risk of dying from heart disease (20Trusted Source).

What’s more, several randomized controlled studies report that vegan diets are much more effective at reducing blood sugar, LDL cholesterol and total cholesterol levels than the diets they are compared to (7Trusted Source, 9Trusted Source, 10Trusted Source, 12Trusted Source, 46Trusted Source).

This may be particularly beneficial to heart health since reducing high blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels may reduce the risk of heart disease by as much as 46% (47Trusted Source).

Compared to the general population, vegans also tend to consume more whole grains and nuts, both of which are good for your heart (48Trusted Source, 49Trusted Source).

BOTTOM LINE:
Vegan diets may benefit heart health by significantly reducing the risk factors that contribute to heart disease.

2. A Vegan Diet Can Reduce Pain from Arthritis
A few studies have reported that a vegan diet has positive effects in people with different types of arthritis.

One study randomly assigned 40 arthritic participants to either continue eating their omnivorous diet or switch to a whole-food, plant-based vegan diet for 6 weeks.

Those on the vegan diet reported higher energy levels and better general functioning than those who didn’t change their diet (50Trusted Source).

Two other studies investigated the effects of a probiotic-rich, raw food vegan diet on symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.

Both reported that participants in the vegan group experienced a greater improvement in symptoms such as pain, joint swelling and morning stiffness than those who continued their omnivorous diet (51Trusted Source
Trusted Source

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, 52Trusted Source).

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